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big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
opportunities that, you hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. studies have shown that throughout the united iowa, that also in all growth in workforce in the 30 years will be attributable to immigrants. because of this demographic of retiring baby-boomers and the after them.oming and, of course, also, i think, alluded to, we also need to fill jobs that are currently here. need to create jobs, we need innovation. this is where immigrants have contributed to america as well. immigrants are more likely as a roup to start businesses, immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they're high-tech the industries and that than native foreign counterparts. and then finally, we have to we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from rest of the world. economy.'s true for our and so therefore our economy is sum game. our workforce is not a zero sum game. usinesses and workers adapt to changing policies and circumstances. so we work with the rest of the a sense we're in competition for the rest of the world. or exports, imports, and workforce. so immigration from the business sh
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
a massive outbreak of measles in america. well, some people are blaming some christian teachings. >>> and a montana teacher is convicted of raping a 14-year-old student. why did the teacher only get 30 days in jail? days in jail? >>> let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >p >>> "outfront>>> "outfrn drumbep drumbeat to wdrurn drumbep drumbeat to wdrum louder. wall street suffered its worst day since june as the obama administration clearly laid the groundwork for a possible military strike on syria. >> there's no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in syria. the syrian regime. the president believes and i believe that those who use chemical weapons against defenseless men, women and children should and must be held accountable. >> market analyst todd schoenberger is "outfront" with us tonight. thank you for being here. how much of the drumbeat you heard from the vice president and the president and the administration about oil in the region? >> quite a bit because it's a grave concern for everybody at wall street. it was top of mi
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
on booknotes in 1998 to talk about his book "a dream deferred" the second betrayal of black freedom in america. in this collection of essays the author writes about post-civil rights america the liberalism movement that was ultimately more harmful were for racial equality than was helpful. mr. steele says the movement toward equality was less about a true movement towards racial harmony and more about white america's attempt about the decade of segregation. this is about an hour. c-span: shelby steele, author of "a dream deferred." you talk about your father in this book a little bit, talk--say he's a--more of a persuader than an intimidator. what did you mean by that? >> guest: well, literally, he was a--he was a--he liked to talk and he liked to think and he was a very--his approach was to--he wanted people to feel--to identify with his position on things, not just to agree with him, but to--to see the--to--to actually identify with the position. and so, he--he mu--was much more interested in persuading someone to see why he was taking the position that he was taking, than actually making th
taxes. democrats want to give them more power? they want this agency involved in america's healthcare? no way. watchdogagency's own says the irs can't handle the job. , the inspector general stated they are not 'snfident about the irs ability to protect confidential information or protect fraud. neither am i. by any indication, neither are the american people. it has been three years since the healthcare law was passed. in less than two months, the administration claims it will be ready to implement the law. in the face of all these , more americans than ever want this law to be repealed. it is simple. increased healthcare costs to families and individuals. it has stifled individuals from expanding. it has forced job creators to cut hours. just yesterday, a key official could not confirm that the healthcare law was lowered in my home state of michigan. wasn't this the signature propolis -- promise of this administration? premiums would be lower. the administration cannot make good on that promise. with so little time before , it ises are set to open extremely concerning that the admin
supports the nsa surveillance program. he says the program itself works in protecting america from terrorism and has what he calls a 99.99% batting average in being compliant. >> this whole tone of snooping and spying that we use i think it's horrible, it's a distortion and a smear and a slander of good patriotic americans. >> reporter: senator rand paul, by the way, says the constitutionality of the nsa program must be evaluated. steve? >> thank you very much. peter king went directly at rand paul, said basically he's lying about the program. and he's just breathless in defending it as michael hayden. where is the president? he doesn't go to pat for this. he's analyzing this and it's his program. from michael hayden he says "the washington post" publishes this story. look at the numbers. there's been 115 incidents, incorrectly entered. mistakes made. none intentional. so that's out of 61 million inquiries a compliance rate of 99.998. look beyond the numbers and the headlines. >> right. michael hayden has and i temple in the "usa today" today where he talks in an op-ed just trust u
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. shimkus: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to remember and recall the life of carla anderson. carla passed away on july 23, after a month-long fight against an infection. she was 52, a loving mother, devoted wife and deputy executive director of the next generation 911 institute. it was in this capacity that i had the privilege of working with her. technology continued to move forward, congresswoman anna eshoo and i worked closely as part of the congressional e-911 congress. she was part of legislation passed by congress to advance 911 services. in so doing, many lives have been saved. as first responders throughout the country could not on
. [booing] over the next 15 months, we are going to decide what kind of america we want to have. what kind of kentucky want to have. there are only two answers to this question. barack obama's vision for america. or kentucky's. ground -- crowd does not like it. kentucky's voice is often the voice of opposition. to the obama agenda. i am proud of that. that is why every liberal in america, every liberal in america have announced they will beat us next year. know, the liberals are worried because it just as i predicted obama care is a disaster for america. [applause] i fought them every step of the way, every step of the government takeover. up to their war on coal. look, as long as i am in the senate, kentucky will have a voice. [applause] all of these liberals to come down here to push me around, they are not going to get away with it, are they? ind paul, it would fill, and -- ed whitfield, and i take the fight every single day. let me give you an example. a few months ago thomas the cannots decided that you fish below the dams below the river anymore. up the group and we got together with
are an undocumented worker in america, you are a captive. >>female farm workers empowered to speak out. >> frontline correspondent lowell bergman, in collaboration with univision and the center for investigative reporting, investigate. >> no one's ever been charged for rape or assault? >> no. >> tonight, "rape in the fields." frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, with grants from jon and jo ann hagler on behalf of the jon l. hagler foundation. and scott nathan and laura debonis. >> lowell bergman: there are over a half-million women working in the fields of america. most are undocumented immigrants. this is a story about the price many women pay t
of violence in america calls each of us to collectively resist all forms of violence in our society. in particular, black on black violence that disproportionately affects every facet of black life in america. we must learn to live together in peace or we will most surely die apart in our own neglect. on the other hand, reaction on twitter. allen west tweeted, who will the president of the united states identify with this time? so we're starting to see more reaction on both sides of the aisle. ainsley, steve, brian, back to you. >> about time. thank you very much. >>> let's talk about the nsa. another revelation came out yesterday afternoon and it turns out that they have -- they have released additional information over the past -- since 2008 on things that have gone wrong in the nsa collection. for example, there was a redacted page which is unredacted and classified yesterday that revealed that we have collected 56,000 wholly domestic communications each year. so this is done, nothing was necessarily done with it. nothing was exposed by it. but these were collected and the fisa c
to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with income taxes ge
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
, and will be replaced by al jazeera america. in our time here in "the war room" we have focused on important political stories from our march goes on series, to controlling the playing of gun violence in this country and the immigration reform debate that continues to rage on. joining me now inside "the war room" are two of my current colleagues and friends, john fugelsang, the host of "viewpoint, who has the second best hair on this network, and my very close friend, "the young turks" studio in los angeles cenk uygur. thank you both for joining us in "the war room" one last time. >> thank you, michael. >> thank you. >> michael: john, i'm sgoorth with you what do you think the impact that current tv has had on the progressive discussion if any at all? >> well, that's a good question. i have to say it was positive, if not necessarily profound. while this whole experience has proven that liberals are very good at capitalism, i'm very happy for mr. gore, i don't think network had the chance to make the proper impact it could have had had it had proper promotions behind it. i think if we would have had a
which america could take military action in syria this as calls grow to forcefully respond to evidence that the assad regime killed hundreds of its own people with chemical weapons. >>> the wildfire the size of the chicago raging in and around a cherished american landmark, the yosemite national park but the rim fire poses a threat to hundred of thousands of residents in san francisco and it is a 150 miles away. we'll tell you about that. >>> sentencing for the army major convicted of killing 13 people in the fort hood shooting massacre the will nidal hasan get life in prison or the death penalty. but first right now, brand new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
>>> good morning, america. breaking overnight. swallowed up. the massive sinkhole, opening up under a popular florida resort. windows cracking. more evacuated. we're live at the scene. >>> breaking new details on the dramatic end to a six-day hostage ordeal. 16-year-old hannah anderson rescued after an fbi shootout. the heroes on horseback who found her speak out this morning. >>> i wanted to dedicate this award to cory. >> a surprise appearance by "glee" star lea michele, speaking out for the first time, about her love and the loss of her boyfriend, co-star cory monteith. why no one expected this heartfelt tribute right now. >>> and carrie underwood is here, live, like you have never seen her before. she says hosting "gma" has been her dream. now, she's heading into the anchor chair with us. >> hey, everybody, are you ready for a good morning, america? >>> good morning, america. all of our viewers in the west. robin and sam off today. great to have ginger here. lara to my right. different angle. we have a lot to get to this morning. including the latest the alarming sinkhole outsid
. >>> joining me now is john watch -- walsh. host of america's most wanted. fascinating interview, painting a very different picture, sort of kind of persona that we seem to be dealing with with a mass killer and kidnapper. what do you make of it? >> well, he's certainly hoping it isn't his friend and we live in such a society that both you and i would say this man is accused of kidnapping this girl and murdering her mother and probably her brother. we should stay accused by the fbi and police say he is pedophile that kidnapped a 16-year-old girl and the main suspect in the murder e of her mother and the murder of her 8-year-old brother, although they haven't determined those are his remains yet. so it seems the law enforcement agencies and the state of california, which issued the amber alert think he's the number one suspect. let's not forget about jerry sandusky who was sod miezing an 11-year-old boy in the locker room and nobody could believe it was jerry sandusky. >> right. >> ariel castro who kept three girls in a house for ten years, his little 14-year-old daughter was gina dee jesu
states of america and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from maryland reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. issa: at this time i'd like to yield one minute to the gentleman from north carolina. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to address the individual from maryland, the gentleman from maryland as he lks about it's all about all employees and indeed it is because if we allow this continued behavior to go on, it tarnishes the good reputation workers that day in, day out serve this country and the citizens so well. mr. meadows: and what we're talking about is giving a tool, a management tool to let managers manage. we're talking about not giving bonuses, mr. speaker. we're talking about not giving bonuses to those that are at the very highest, the 1%, while the rank and file goes so many times without being recognized or compensated for what they deserve. you know, we're talking about employees that make
of america's most vocal critics. we shouldn't forget the difference between the ability of our government to collect information online under strict guidelines and for narrow purposes than the willingness of some other governments to throw their own citizens in prison for what they say online. >> stephanie: talking to you, putin. >> we're not there. >> stephanie: right. [ ♪ battle hymn of republic ] >> i'm with alan grayson. >> stephanie: what did edward snowden get wrong? everything. andrew lightman in the "l.a. times." we posted this up at stephanie miller facebook. snowden is out of his limbo. i hope the food is lousy, the winter is cold and the internet access is awful. >> it is russia. you're pretty much guaranteed all three of those. >> stephanie: i worry more about the damage snowden has done and could still do to strike the right balance between privacy and security. i do, too. he says those following snowden should understand two key points. first, though many things need to be kept secret in today's dangerous world, the line between secret and not secret is stark. the harsh t
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
of the united states of america" is a biography and portrait of each first lady. it is now available for the discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping and can be found at c- span.org/products. the c-span town hall meeting that discusses the future of political parties. following that, nancy pelosi. after that, a town hall meeting with senator john mccain. >> this is a c-span townhall. you good tos away, have more of your say. during congress's recess, tuesday, wednesday, and thursday night on c-span, we are looking at public politics and talking to you about positions. welcome to c-span town hall tonight. we will ask you about the future of your political party. who is the future leader, the likely presidential candidate, and maybe it is somebody that is not necessarily yet on the national scene. a couple of ways for you to participate, by phone. we will open up the lines now. make sure you mute your television and radio when you call in. you can also use twitter. we will read tweets from members of congress who are back in their home states and districts for the august recess. some p
wrote about in the "the washington post" this week. america's chronic overreaction to terrorism, we have created an economy of fear, an industry of fear, a national psychology of fear. al qaeda could have never achieved that on its own. we have inflicted it on ourselves. >> fundamentally, there are two sets of questions that apply in the war against terrorism. the one set of questions deals with the where's it going to happen, what's going to happen, and when is it going to happen. the other set of questions deals with what is it that our enemy, the terrorists, are trying to achieve? what are they trying to induce us to do? take a look at what's been happening over the past week. with a conference call, al qaeda has effectively shut down 20 u.s. embassies around north africa and the middle east. we just had the president of yemen here for a meeting with president obama. he goes back feeling wonderful about his new relationship with the president. next thing the president does is says in effect, sorry, but we don't trust you yemenis to protect your embassies so in effect we shut down our
>>> good morning, america. this morning, breaking news. a massive multistate manhunt is over. >> she's coming home. >> hannah anderson rescued, her alleged kidnapper shot dead in the idaho wilderness by an elite fbi hostage rescuer. this morning, how the fbi got their man, and how hannah is doing now. >>> in reverse. gas prices plunging as the peak summer driving season comes to an end. plus, why we are likely to pay even less at the pump next year. >>> and the mystery and intrigue surrounding the most famous painting on earth. the high-tech researchers crawling into a crypt, perhaps on the verge of identifying the real mona lisa. >>> and are you smarter than an eighth grader from the year 1912? this is a recently rediscovered exam from more than 100 years ago. it's incredibly hard. >> who invented the cotton gin? >> man. >> no, i just -- >>> i have this exam right here. it's incredibly embarrassing. describe the battle of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the bat
exactly who he is talking about. in the meantime one of the most outspoken businessmen into america might try to pay his way into the white house, so he says. donald trump is willing to shell out big bucks for presidential bid in 2016. he had a short run campaign in the republican primaries but dropped out to back former governor mitt romney. "the donald" explaining just how far he is willing to dig into his wallet. >> if you were to run for president, how much would you be will to spend on your campaign? >> if i made a decision i would spend a lot. >> a modern presidential campaign can be half a billion dollars. >> can be or more. no, i would be willing to spend, if i did it i would spend whatever it took. jenna: if, if he did it. claiming a fortune more than $10 billion, trump said voters would see a man who built a company with tremendous net worth. he hasn't been totally forthcoming about how much money is actually in his companies which has been controversial over the last self years but that's what he says his company is worth. we'll take him at his word. >> he has been accused in t
that brought sweeping republican gains two years later. america seems to be left with the status quo. the gop kept control of the house. the division between the parties is as sharp as ever. that doesn't mean it wasn't worth the ride. we are treated to spicy anecdote like the empty chair in tampa. balls says top romney advisers were sickened. he walked out of the room and threw up. there was insight into the mind set of an obama team ready to engage in hostilities. case and point, jim messina said my favorite philosopher is mike tyson. he said everyone has a plan until you punch them in the face. my job is to punch them in the face. it was fought out in small ways. if 2008 was inspiring, 2012 was negative and nasty. joining us is dan balls, author of "collision 2012." dan, thanks so much for joining the program and congrats on the book. >> thank you. glad to be here. >> we are happy to have you. the future of elections in america, after 2012, given the prolonged and insane nature, what do you think each party learned and how do you think it's going to affect 2016? >> you speak of long campaig
or is it the other way around. when it comes to race in america it doesn't feel like we're always going in the right direction. they've sent in the clowns, literally, and we'll see which way we're moving in today's big news. "the war room" starts now. [ ♪ music ] >> michael: man, is it good to be back in this state. we're going to be here for four more days. stay with us, we have a great week of shows. earlier today here in san francisco attorney general eric holder laid out plans to alleviate overcrowded prisons and address racism in the justice system. >> as we come together, we need to discuss although incarceration has a significant role to play in our justice system, it can be ineffective and unsustainable. it poses a significant uneconomic burden. it comes with human and moral costs that are impossible to calculate. >> michael: the attorney general. the defendants with drug charges but no ties to large scale drugs organizations will be able to hold draconian mandatory minimum sentences. eric holder comes after one month after 1,000 inmates in california initiated a hunger strike to protest
is it all of a sudden america's fault? and i couldn't agree more with the previous callers that say we should not give any more money to any nation that behaves this way. detroit is bankrupt. sacramento, california, is bankrupt. we have huge, huge problems over here as far as infrastructure. i think we should take care of our own. i'm a first generation american and i can tell you, these countries, we give money -- they don't share our values, they don't share our beliefs, they don't have the same respect for human life that we do. we have absolutely no business giving them our money. i thank you very much. hubie: thank you, shane. from maryland. our next caller from ports myth, howe. good morning. caller: good morning. i enjoy your program here. just a quick comment about what's going on in egypt. people don't realize that they it -- america a pretty much put the president there before, and they lived under, generally, what america -- with freedom. now they have this muslim brotherhood guy who came in here and tried to slowly bring back shari'a law to this country. they'll people are
, or you will not have a relationship with the united states of america. >> i spoke with the former secretary of state last week. she's having a very good new life. she's teaching at stamford enjoying golf and having a chance to thing about the world from a very different perspective. >> good to hear it. i know we're going to see more of that. >> she talks about iran's new president and what's going on in syria and john kerry's attempt at the peace process. >>> one person is missing after a flash flood swept through colorado. a heavy rain triggered the floods in manitou springs. kelly werthmann of our denver affiliate tells how one thing led to another. >> this is the most terrifying thing i've ever seen. i can't stop shaking. >> reporter: amateur video caught this late friday gushing at speeds of up to 30 miles an hour. the flash flooding brought on by a torrential downpour turned roadways is into raging rapids in a manner of minutes. >> our car just floated away. others are floating away now. >> reporter: firefighters rescued this man from a swoling cree
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
. >> you next time? >> that's right. that's my new role in america. >> in all that matters. >> a panda family reunion in china. this adorable giant panda cub was reintroduced to her mother last week. she was born july 6th but taken away when her leg was hurt. >> on "cbs this morning." >> the executives at blackberry are considering selling off the company. it's being called a very lucrative move by six years ago magazine. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning" and good morning, norah. >> good morning to you charlie. >> lots of interesting stories this morning. we begin with this new concerns that al qaeda is on the move. the iraq al qaeda group has changed its name to the islamic state of iraq to show their growing ambition. >> and there are growing fears syria is to become the new haven for terrorists. they warn it could create the world's great eterror threat. lara logan, good morning. >> good morning, norah, good morning, charlie. >> how dangerous is al qaeda in syria and what are you worried about? >> dangerous enough for the deputy di
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
will be back in a half hour with news and weather. until then back to new york for good morning america. [ music ]♪ [ dad ] so i walked into that dealer's office and you know what i walked out with? [ slurps ] [ dad ] a new passat. [ dad ] 0% apr. 60 months. done and done. [ dad ] in that driveway, is a german-engineered piece of awesome. that i got for 0% apr. good one, dad. thank you, dalton. [ male announcer ] it's the car you won't stop talking about. ever. hurry in to the volkswagen best. thing. ever. event. and get 0% apr for 60 months, now until september 3rd. that's the power of german engineering. >>> good morning, america! good morning, america. >> that's good. >> i think you got it down. there she is, carrie underwood. no more practice necessary. she's going to be co-hosting here with us in a little bit. it's a lifelong dream of hers. we'll have fun with her here at the desk in a little bit. >> a journalism major, she's got this. she's got this. >>> also coming up, the new pictures out of usher's little boy, recovers days after the accident in the family pool. the late
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